Photoset

Dec 6, 2013
@ 7:29 pm
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the-absolute-best-photography:

thisisnotmyfairytaleendingg:This is most most bizarre underwater world in Austria’s (western Europe).It complicity different with other Nature gifts.yes the winter time almost half of the year,the lake is almost completely dry and people used as a  park. However, during the spring, when the temperature rises and the snow melts from surrounding mountains, the basin of land below the mountains fills with water.each and every year 12m of water rising temperatures.

(Source: brain-food, via monoire)


Photoset

Dec 6, 2013
@ 7:26 pm
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41,211 notes

tafalist:

sosuperawesome:

Yumi Okita

Wow! These are awesome!

(via scientificillustration)


Photoset

Dec 6, 2013
@ 7:24 pm
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3 notes

telepresent-animal-jess:

———————————————————

I keep looking, looking.

And, there, I adore …

and only I shall know if

it was requisite failure.

———————————————————

No true hybrids of wetware and hardware, no horror, no poetry, no resolve for animals and humans survived the two months of studio experiments with the caterpillars/chrysalises butterflies. Rather, a strange pinkish reliquary of sights and thoughts. 

I wouldn’t call the time fruitless, I now see myself neither here nor there when it comes to the animal kingdom. I think of animals as home not in the lesser of two worlds (human or animal), but existing in a third realm, outside of human knowledge. I want to think of animals as subjects in their own right to see how this challenges art-interventions otherwise welcomed. I am much more sensitive than before. For example: the butterflies release a beautiful reddish-pink excrement after emerging from the chrysalis, friends have seen this in my studio and suggested this should be my next project. But how can I bring 100+ organisms into my studio for the sole purpose of harvesting their excrement for a beautiful composition. What do they gain? This is an important question to me. In the case of the butterfly excrement painting, the organism gains nothing, not as far as I can tell. In my opinion quite the opposite occurs, as the organism is brought into the world as a commodity and leaves as such. No agency for the animal here. Typically this type of encounter goes unchallenged, because animals are perceived as lesser than humans. So, the challenge for me is really thinking about how I can show an alternative world where the line between animals and humans can be replaced with something more interesting, and more helpful for us both. 

Traditional narratives are being restructured. As a result, people feel a greater need to personally participate in the discovery of values that affect and order their lives, to dissolve the division that separates them from control, freedom…  ` Lynn Hershman Lesson

(Source: lookingthinkingmeetinganimals, via telepresent-animal)


Photoset

Dec 6, 2013
@ 7:22 pm
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54,262 notes

patrondebris:

beben-eleben:

Origins of Common UI Symbols

Cooool.

(via misotrashy)


Photo

Dec 6, 2013
@ 7:17 pm
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http://www.upworthy.com/the-poster-is-mesmerizing-the-story-it-tells-is-electrifying-have-you-seen

Check out the work coming out of the Beehive Design Collective and their Kickstarter Campaign! 

http://www.upworthy.com/the-poster-is-mesmerizing-the-story-it-tells-is-electrifying-have-you-seen

Check out the work coming out of the Beehive Design Collective and their Kickstarter Campaign! 


Photoset

Dec 6, 2013
@ 7:12 pm
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5,194 notes

rhamphotheca:

Not Your Texas Style Armadillo

Here’s an Internet bizarrity that you can believe in: the pink fairy armadillo.

by Susan Milius

It’s a real animal, the smallest armadillo species in the world. At about 100 grams, it would fit in your hands. It’s covered with “very fine, silky white hair,” says Mariella Superina of the CONICET research center in Mendoza, Argentina. And its hard outer covering, rich in blood vessels, can blush pink.

Full details of Chlamyphorus truncatus biology, though, might as well be a fairy tale. It’s known only from a dry, sandy swath of Argentina and spends most of its time underground. The pink fairy is so hard to spot that Superina and her colleagues are struggling to determine whether it’s endangered or not. She heads an international group of specialists now trying to assess the risk of extinction for the world’s 21 known armadillo species, plus their close relatives, the sloths and anteaters.

In 10 years of field work, she has never caught sight of the pink species in the wild. She has seen tracks made by digging claws and the diamond-shaped tip of its tail. After several meters, the tracks just stop where, she presumes, the armadillo disappeared underground. Locals, she says, “can track down any animal — except the pink fairy armadillo.”…

(read more: Science News)

photos: Nicholas Smythe/Getty Images; Paul Vogt; M. Superina

(via howstuffworks)


Photoset

Dec 6, 2013
@ 7:11 pm
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201 notes

fastcompany:

Incredible Photos From An Urban Explorer’s Journeys To The Forbidden Parts Of The City

Urban explorer Bradley Garrett documents his adventures dodging guards and documenting sites in a new book. These are some of his best photos.


Video

Dec 4, 2013
@ 4:00 pm
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57 notes

arstechnica:

Check out this hacker’s flying contraption that can hijack other drones and turn them into zombie drones… then jump into the comments because the creator showed up. 


Link

Dec 4, 2013
@ 3:59 pm
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2 notes

Airmail, to your door | Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences »

harvardseas:

Airmail, to your door? Professor Rob Wood, who builds robotic insects at SEAS, offers his take on Amazon’s idea…


Photo

Dec 4, 2013
@ 3:57 pm
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73 notes

theparisreview:

“The dumplings communicated my history, my childhood, the people that I came from, people I hoped he’d soon call family. If we were going to stay together, the dumplings would have to play a role.” 
Amy Butcher on familial tradition, heritage, and spätzle.

theparisreview:

“The dumplings communicated my history, my childhood, the people that I came from, people I hoped he’d soon call family. If we were going to stay together, the dumplings would have to play a role.” 

Amy Butcher on familial tradition, heritage, and spätzle.


Photoset

Dec 4, 2013
@ 3:44 pm
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3 notes

Three Parts Per Trillion (December 2013)

McKenzie Wilhelm

Three Parts Per Trillion captures the volume of a trillion particles within the outer cloth boundary, and three of these particles are exaggerated and represented by the copper handkerchiefs in the room. The trillion particles made visible within this space partners with the surrounding domestic objects enveloping the viewer in a cozy space with cues of home. The copper handkerchiefs, delicately embroidered with the monogram of copper’s chemical structure provide an open invitation to be touched and inspected. When they are touched, the warm light of the room is extinguished, disorienting the viewer in an unexpected and abrupt moment of darkness. This human experience translates how toxic copper levels in the water affect salmon. Their ability to smell is effected when copper levels reach three parts per trillion. Smell is their primary sense, and imprinted smells of home direct them back to their natal spawning grounds.


Video

Nov 26, 2013
@ 7:02 pm
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8 notes

videoartexplorer:

16 channel VideoSculpture “Screenscaping Berlin _ Ästhetik des Verfalls; Design for Electronics Sterben” by [dNASAb] 2013

16 LCD screens, 48 ft of LED’s,cast plastics, speakers, auto-start media players, HD audio/video tracks 120 in. x 120 in.(10 ft x 10 ft )

"The instant my mother passed away; every screen in the house-glitched-and froze, my sister says "there she is" pointing at the screen,and she was right"[dNASAb]

Site specific,16 channel video sculpture.This piece is on long-term exhibition/loan to The WYE Berlin and was exhibited in this years Cyberfest 2013, with Cyland Media Art Lab from St.Petersburg, Russia http://www.cyland.org/
http://cylandfest.com/site/

"The clarity of the bubbling video goo, oozing from the cracks and melted holes in the led screen, jittered glitch-y line drawings of sadness, whilst I killed it." [dNASAb]


Link

Nov 26, 2013
@ 6:47 pm
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3 notes

Bees Detect Cancer!! »

Portuguese designer Susana Soares has developed a device for detecting cancer and other serious diseases using trained bees. The bees are placed in a glass chamber into which the patient exhales; the bees fly into a smaller secondary chamber if they detect cancer.

Scientists have found that honey bees – Apis mellifera – have an extraordinary sense of smell that is more acute than that of a sniffer dog and can detect airborne molecules in the parts-per-trillion range.

Bees can be trained to detect specific chemical odours, including the biomarkers associated with diseases such as tuberculosis, lung, skin and pancreatic cancer.


Photoset

Nov 23, 2013
@ 6:24 pm
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Poodle Moths and Dog-pillars :)

http://karlshuker.blogspot.com/2012/08/mystery-of-venezuelan-poodle-moth-have.html

I thought a few of you might enjoy the bottom spoof—- but the inspiration for the Photoshop work might make for a great next microscope encounter


Photoset

Nov 23, 2013
@ 5:04 pm
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2,356 notes

the-fire-that-remains:

Beautiful Textures in handmade books by Benjamin Reynaert

Portfolio

(Source: showslow, via theglassunicorn)